Friday, December 30, 2011

My Tortoise Ring Brings in the New Year!






Last time you read about the tortoise project, the silver clay was ready to fire.  After programming the kiln and waiting the required time, I held my breath and opened the door.  There it was!  Of course I had to try it on to see if it fit before I did anything else.  Success!


When silver clay gets fired, the organic part of the clay burns up and the heat fuses the micro filaments of silver to become 99% fine silver.  After the firing the silver looks white.  Once I brush it with a brass brush, the color turns to the silver color one expects.   

Now comes the sanding and polishing. 






I want to be able to see the pattern of the tortoise better and that requires a patina of liver of sulphur.  The water is warm when I put a small amount of the liver of sulphur gel, mix it, and put in the silver pieces. 


After the silver pieces start to darken to the color I want, they will go into a separate dish of water with baking soda to stop the color change.



 
The final polishing leaves the dark patina in the crevices.  And my ring is ready for the New Year!
Happy New Year Everyone!!


Sunday, December 25, 2011

Happy Holidays


Merry Christmas
And
Happy New Year’s
From Our house to yours!
Linda and Peter
Linda Britt Design





My Paperweight Collection Adds Sparkle to the Table!

Friday, December 23, 2011

Christmas Memories

Today I decided to make Christmas cookies.  I’ve been putting off holiday baking because …well honestly I don’t need to eat all those cookies and brownies and goodies that show up on my hips!
 But today I threw caution to the winds and made sugar cookies – the kind that get rolled out and cut into shapes.  I chose that kind because I wanted to use the cookie cutters that my Mom and I used when I was a little girl.  Yes, I still have them.  They are red plastic and are showing some wear!  I am too!
Making the dough was almost like having Mom here again.  I could hear her telling me how to cream the butter and sugar; how to put the rolled out dough in the refrigerator so it would be easier to cut into shapes; how to watch the cookies in the oven and take them out just as the edges started to turn light brown.   “Be sure to put the cookie cutters in the flour before putting it on the dough.”  I thought about how patient my mother was as I learned to cook and how special she made those lessons.
The cookie cutters are a mixture of circus animals and a clown mixed in with Christmas Santa, bells, trees and angels.  We used all of them and the camel’s head broke off and the elephant’s leg fell off just like I remembered!  Fragile animal cookies and so much fun to relive a little piece of Christmas past.  Really good cookies too!


Tuesday, December 20, 2011

The Migration of the Sandhill Crane

Before I met Peter, my avid birder, I had never heard of the Sandhill Crane.  That changed as I began to learn about birds and become aware of my surroundings!   
Sandhill Cranes fly south for the winter forming flocks of over 10,000 birds.  One terrific place to observe them is at Bosque del Apache in New Mexico.  There is an annual Sand Hill Crane Festival every November. 
We took a birding trip and got up very early in the cold morning to get to the area where the cranes would take off and land.  Thousands of these birds migrate to this area each year to create quite a noisy spectacle.  The birds are skilled at soaring with their 5 -7 ft wingspan and they can ride the thermals for hours at a time.  These beautiful light grey birds with red foreheads land by the water and in fields making loud trumpeting calls.  They eat plants, grains, mice, snakes, insects, and worms.  They often dig in the farmer’s fields for tubers…..probably not politically correct behavior!
All cranes dance, which includes bowing, jumping, running, stick or grass tossing, as well as wing flapping.  Commonly associated with courtship, dancing can occur at any age and season.  It is generally believed to be a normal part of motor development for cranes and thwarts aggression, relieves tension, and strengthens the pair bond.  Sounds like some of the same reasons we dance!
Since that first trip, I’ve seen Sandhill Cranes in several other places in Arizona most recently in Cibola National Wildlife Refuge.  I’ve included some links that might be of interest to you if you want to follow the migration in AZ.  The Cranes can also be found migrating to freshwater wetlands in Florida, Texas, Utah, Mexico and California.  They breed in Northern U.S., Canada, Alaska, and Siberia. 
http://www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/newmex/bosque/
http://www.wingsoverwillcox.com/

http://www.pearcesunsiteschamber.org/portal/AbouttheArea/SandHillCranesandBirding/tabid/68/Default.aspx


http://www.fws.gov/refuges/profiles/index.cfm?id=22540

Friday, December 16, 2011

The Tortoise Project Continues!


2 Silver Clay Tortoises and 1 original sculpture


The last post about the tortoise left you hanging…..... with a mold ready to use!  The original sculpture was done with polymer clay and baked.  The mold was made with 2 part mold compound and I was concerned about his head and made a second one.  Just a note here….the first one was the best!

For those of you not too familiar with silver metal clay, here is a brief description.  The clay is made of micro filaments of silver (recycled I understand) and blended with an organic mixture so the clay is malleable.  It dries pretty quickly so it is important to work quickly and keep the clay moist. 
Getting the two parts ready
In the case of my tortoise, I conditioned the clay and pressed it into both parts of the mold and let it dry.  Then I removed it from the mold and was anxious to see how the two parts fit together.  With a little adjustment they did well!  After cleaning the insides and sanding them so that the sides were thinner, I attached top and bottom with wet clay. 



Top and Bottom Attached

Now I needed to accentuate the design, clean up the rough clay and sand and polish.  Since I have two turtles from two molds, I decided to make one as a pendant and one as a ring.  For the pendant I drilled small holes for wire to go through the body and for the ring I made a textured band.  The clay shrinks so I made the ring 1 ½ sizes larger than my finger.
Textured ring band




All ready to fire! 

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

A Gift Wrapping Idea!

more flower hairclips at www.etsy.com/shop/lindabrittdesign


Hair clips, ribbon flowers, feathers, and beaded flowers are very popular this Christmas.  Since it is time to wrap my holiday gifts and because I like to be creative, I took one of my ribbon flower hair clips and attached it to ribbon on a package.  Rave reviews!  So the person who receives my gift gets a bonus…a pretty package, the gift inside the box, and a one of a kind hair clip!  It will be a gift she will remember and be able to wear in her hair or on a hat all year!

Other shops to peruse for hair  http://www.etsy.com/listing/88428691/emerald-kelly-green-and-black-peacock?ref=ss_listing

http://www.etsy.com/listing/86230312/lime-green-and-white-french-beaded?ref=pr_shop

Friday, December 9, 2011

Taking A Holiday Break!


Lots happening in my life this week so I’m taking a break from the tortoise project while I participate in a couple of holiday sales.   Tuesday was the Hassayampa Holiday Sale at the Hassayampa Golf Club. (Dec. 6). 
The second holiday sale is this Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Hidden Valley Association Clubhouse.  1615 Coyote Road, Prescott AZ.  Time 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.   If anyone is in the area, please stop by and see the ornaments and 10 artists’ creations!  There will be lots of pre-Christmas shopping just waiting for you.  Bring a can of food for the underprivileged Prescott families. (Saint Vincent de Paul donations).

This Thursday (Dec. 8) my friend, Willie, and I are going to Phoenix to have High Tea at the Arizona Biltmore.
http://www.etsy.com/listing/57237052/on-sale-vintage-brown-hat-with-tri-color
It’s taking some thinking on my part to decide how to dress for this social event!  There is snow on the ground in Prescott and it is supposed to be around 17 degrees at night.  Planning for sunny warmer Phoenix is taking time and I still have to select a hat to wear from my vintage hat collection. 
http://www.etsy.com/listing/52324893/on-sale-vintage-blue-feathered-tam
  
 It is so hard for me to admit that I do not have time to carve on my tortoise so I can write about it in this post.   This week’s social schedule has taken over!  Just like in the story, the tortoise may be slow but he will make the finish line!

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

The Tortoise Continues (Making the Mold)

A recap!  I carved a tortoise from red polymer clay in my previous post.   The turtle needed a little more detailing with a carving tool to make the design on the underside more visible. 
Now it’s time for the next step – Making the Mold from the red tortoise model. 
  
 The two part mold compound in this case is Part A white and Part B purple.  When part A and B are mixed I have about 10-15 minutes of working time before the mixture sets. 
A small amount of this mold making compound went with me to Tanzania where I made a mold of a beetle.  It amazed the guide and I gave him some to take home to his kids.  I always wondered what they did with it.


Part A and B were mixed by pressing and folding them into each other. 




Then I wrapped it around the red tortoise pressing so that the designs on the model would show in the mold. 
To give a separation for the top and bottom of the turtle, I took an x-acto knife and cut the mold in half without removing the turtle. 
The mold compound set and I removed the red turtle.  Check out the mold!
The turtle’s head might be a problem when I put the metal clay in the mold so I decided to make another mold that would let the head be in a better place when I removed it.  My next post will show two turtles in metal clay – one from each mold.  
So far so good!  Stay tuned!









Friday, December 2, 2011

Tortoise or the Hare? I’m going for the Tortoise!


After my last post on the Reptile Show, I have decided to make a tortoise out of silver clay.  Thank goodness I have artistic license!  My vision (goal – hope) is to make a small recognizable tortoise that could be duplicated and used as a ring, a pendant, earrings, or beads.  Not having done any of this before, I decided to share the experience with any of you who might be interested! 
First I need to decide on which kind of tortoise….so I Googled ‘tortoise’ and got some amazing pictures.  What a variety!  After looking and thinking, I selected the Star Radiated Tortoise.   It has a very pronounced star pattern and will be a challenge.  
 My plan is to carve a small tortoise out of polymer clay, a medium that is easy to work with and manipulate.  I chose red because I like red! 
I put my new Craftoptic glasses on and start conditioning, moving and carving  referring to the pictures.  As I work with the polymer clay, it gets warm and a little squishy so that my finger prints start to become the pattern.  Start over!  After a few failed attempts, the animal takes shape and is the correct size.  Finally figured out how to put his shell bumps on and texture patterns. 
 Tonight I am baking the red tortoise in my toaster oven. 

 After he is done (hard) I will make a mold and then make several tortoises from silver clay. 



Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Reptile Shows - A New Experience

Have you ever been to a Reptile Show?  If you Google ‘reptile shows’ with your hometown’s name, you might be surprised how many are near you.  I’ve now been to my third one.  And each time I’ve seen and learned so much about both nature and people. 
The first one was in Tucson AZ and I had no idea what to expect...maybe snakes crawling and lizards leaping and weird people.  Once I actually took a deep breath, paid my admission and walked into the large hall, my fears got lost in my amazement of the variety of animals I saw.  
The chameleons were multi-colored and safely caged in habitats of branches and greenery. 
Chameleon
The poisonous Dart Frogs were brightly colored and hopping around the trickling water in their humid terrariums.   (These have toxic skins for their own protection).  Snakes of many patterns and varieties were in containers and carefully monitored. 

Young Green Tree Python


I fell in love with baby bearded dragons as they stacked on top of each other. 
Bearded Dragons
  It was obvious that people were fascinated with these reptiles that originally came from all over the world.  (Now many are captive-bred.)  And now I was one of those ‘weird’ people.
The second show was in Phoenix and there were so many Crested Geckos for sale that I wondered where they all came from.  There are trends in reptile fashions.  Some years there are more boas, some years more corn snakes, some years more skinks.  I had no idea there were so many varieties of lizards, frogs, turtles and snakes.  Nor did I realize that so many people throughout the world are fascinated by them.  Lots to learn!
Crocodile Gecko
This year, Peter and I went to the Phoenix Reptile Expo.  There were more turtles here than I had seen in the past- tiny black polka dotted turtles from Asia, star backed ones called Radiated Tortoises, Pancake Tortoises, and Matamata Turtles.   In general, turtles live in or near the water and have adapted to swim by holding their breath underwater. Tortoises live primarily in arid regions, built for storing their own water supply and walking on sandy ground. 

Pancake Tortoise

There were lots of bearded dragons, crested dragons, geckos, skinks, and chameleons.  Chameleons are fun to look at but not easy to care for. 
Many of the reptiles have been cross-bred to be what are called ‘designer’ reptiles.  The colors and patterns have been altered to be ‘fashionable’. It is often now difficult to find reptiles that have their original coloring and patterns.  But I found an originally colored Leopard Gecko and bought it!  He is very easy to care for and very healthy.   He now has a small aquarium sand and rocks with his hollow log in it. He sleeps during the day and ‘hunts’ at night.  He is a happy lizard! 
There were inanimate replicas of a variety of frogs and lizards for sale and lots of t-shirts and caps.  There were a couple of tables of reptile jewelry and lots of books and accessories. 
It was fascinating watching the people watch the animals, seeing friends meeting friends and vendors exchanging information with each other and customers.  These are animals that get a lot of negative press and are somewhat misunderstood just because they are not warm and fuzzy!  I’m learning so much about them and about how people form attitudes that may or may not be accurate! 



Friday, December 30, 2011

My Tortoise Ring Brings in the New Year!






Last time you read about the tortoise project, the silver clay was ready to fire.  After programming the kiln and waiting the required time, I held my breath and opened the door.  There it was!  Of course I had to try it on to see if it fit before I did anything else.  Success!


When silver clay gets fired, the organic part of the clay burns up and the heat fuses the micro filaments of silver to become 99% fine silver.  After the firing the silver looks white.  Once I brush it with a brass brush, the color turns to the silver color one expects.   

Now comes the sanding and polishing. 






I want to be able to see the pattern of the tortoise better and that requires a patina of liver of sulphur.  The water is warm when I put a small amount of the liver of sulphur gel, mix it, and put in the silver pieces. 


After the silver pieces start to darken to the color I want, they will go into a separate dish of water with baking soda to stop the color change.



 
The final polishing leaves the dark patina in the crevices.  And my ring is ready for the New Year!
Happy New Year Everyone!!


Sunday, December 25, 2011

Happy Holidays


Merry Christmas
And
Happy New Year’s
From Our house to yours!
Linda and Peter
Linda Britt Design





My Paperweight Collection Adds Sparkle to the Table!

Friday, December 23, 2011

Christmas Memories

Today I decided to make Christmas cookies.  I’ve been putting off holiday baking because …well honestly I don’t need to eat all those cookies and brownies and goodies that show up on my hips!
 But today I threw caution to the winds and made sugar cookies – the kind that get rolled out and cut into shapes.  I chose that kind because I wanted to use the cookie cutters that my Mom and I used when I was a little girl.  Yes, I still have them.  They are red plastic and are showing some wear!  I am too!
Making the dough was almost like having Mom here again.  I could hear her telling me how to cream the butter and sugar; how to put the rolled out dough in the refrigerator so it would be easier to cut into shapes; how to watch the cookies in the oven and take them out just as the edges started to turn light brown.   “Be sure to put the cookie cutters in the flour before putting it on the dough.”  I thought about how patient my mother was as I learned to cook and how special she made those lessons.
The cookie cutters are a mixture of circus animals and a clown mixed in with Christmas Santa, bells, trees and angels.  We used all of them and the camel’s head broke off and the elephant’s leg fell off just like I remembered!  Fragile animal cookies and so much fun to relive a little piece of Christmas past.  Really good cookies too!


Tuesday, December 20, 2011

The Migration of the Sandhill Crane

Before I met Peter, my avid birder, I had never heard of the Sandhill Crane.  That changed as I began to learn about birds and become aware of my surroundings!   
Sandhill Cranes fly south for the winter forming flocks of over 10,000 birds.  One terrific place to observe them is at Bosque del Apache in New Mexico.  There is an annual Sand Hill Crane Festival every November. 
We took a birding trip and got up very early in the cold morning to get to the area where the cranes would take off and land.  Thousands of these birds migrate to this area each year to create quite a noisy spectacle.  The birds are skilled at soaring with their 5 -7 ft wingspan and they can ride the thermals for hours at a time.  These beautiful light grey birds with red foreheads land by the water and in fields making loud trumpeting calls.  They eat plants, grains, mice, snakes, insects, and worms.  They often dig in the farmer’s fields for tubers…..probably not politically correct behavior!
All cranes dance, which includes bowing, jumping, running, stick or grass tossing, as well as wing flapping.  Commonly associated with courtship, dancing can occur at any age and season.  It is generally believed to be a normal part of motor development for cranes and thwarts aggression, relieves tension, and strengthens the pair bond.  Sounds like some of the same reasons we dance!
Since that first trip, I’ve seen Sandhill Cranes in several other places in Arizona most recently in Cibola National Wildlife Refuge.  I’ve included some links that might be of interest to you if you want to follow the migration in AZ.  The Cranes can also be found migrating to freshwater wetlands in Florida, Texas, Utah, Mexico and California.  They breed in Northern U.S., Canada, Alaska, and Siberia. 
http://www.fws.gov/southwest/refuges/newmex/bosque/
http://www.wingsoverwillcox.com/

http://www.pearcesunsiteschamber.org/portal/AbouttheArea/SandHillCranesandBirding/tabid/68/Default.aspx


http://www.fws.gov/refuges/profiles/index.cfm?id=22540

Friday, December 16, 2011

The Tortoise Project Continues!


2 Silver Clay Tortoises and 1 original sculpture


The last post about the tortoise left you hanging…..... with a mold ready to use!  The original sculpture was done with polymer clay and baked.  The mold was made with 2 part mold compound and I was concerned about his head and made a second one.  Just a note here….the first one was the best!

For those of you not too familiar with silver metal clay, here is a brief description.  The clay is made of micro filaments of silver (recycled I understand) and blended with an organic mixture so the clay is malleable.  It dries pretty quickly so it is important to work quickly and keep the clay moist. 
Getting the two parts ready
In the case of my tortoise, I conditioned the clay and pressed it into both parts of the mold and let it dry.  Then I removed it from the mold and was anxious to see how the two parts fit together.  With a little adjustment they did well!  After cleaning the insides and sanding them so that the sides were thinner, I attached top and bottom with wet clay. 



Top and Bottom Attached

Now I needed to accentuate the design, clean up the rough clay and sand and polish.  Since I have two turtles from two molds, I decided to make one as a pendant and one as a ring.  For the pendant I drilled small holes for wire to go through the body and for the ring I made a textured band.  The clay shrinks so I made the ring 1 ½ sizes larger than my finger.
Textured ring band




All ready to fire! 

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

A Gift Wrapping Idea!

more flower hairclips at www.etsy.com/shop/lindabrittdesign


Hair clips, ribbon flowers, feathers, and beaded flowers are very popular this Christmas.  Since it is time to wrap my holiday gifts and because I like to be creative, I took one of my ribbon flower hair clips and attached it to ribbon on a package.  Rave reviews!  So the person who receives my gift gets a bonus…a pretty package, the gift inside the box, and a one of a kind hair clip!  It will be a gift she will remember and be able to wear in her hair or on a hat all year!

Other shops to peruse for hair  http://www.etsy.com/listing/88428691/emerald-kelly-green-and-black-peacock?ref=ss_listing

http://www.etsy.com/listing/86230312/lime-green-and-white-french-beaded?ref=pr_shop

Friday, December 9, 2011

Taking A Holiday Break!


Lots happening in my life this week so I’m taking a break from the tortoise project while I participate in a couple of holiday sales.   Tuesday was the Hassayampa Holiday Sale at the Hassayampa Golf Club. (Dec. 6). 
The second holiday sale is this Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Hidden Valley Association Clubhouse.  1615 Coyote Road, Prescott AZ.  Time 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.   If anyone is in the area, please stop by and see the ornaments and 10 artists’ creations!  There will be lots of pre-Christmas shopping just waiting for you.  Bring a can of food for the underprivileged Prescott families. (Saint Vincent de Paul donations).

This Thursday (Dec. 8) my friend, Willie, and I are going to Phoenix to have High Tea at the Arizona Biltmore.
http://www.etsy.com/listing/57237052/on-sale-vintage-brown-hat-with-tri-color
It’s taking some thinking on my part to decide how to dress for this social event!  There is snow on the ground in Prescott and it is supposed to be around 17 degrees at night.  Planning for sunny warmer Phoenix is taking time and I still have to select a hat to wear from my vintage hat collection. 
http://www.etsy.com/listing/52324893/on-sale-vintage-blue-feathered-tam
  
 It is so hard for me to admit that I do not have time to carve on my tortoise so I can write about it in this post.   This week’s social schedule has taken over!  Just like in the story, the tortoise may be slow but he will make the finish line!

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

The Tortoise Continues (Making the Mold)

A recap!  I carved a tortoise from red polymer clay in my previous post.   The turtle needed a little more detailing with a carving tool to make the design on the underside more visible. 
Now it’s time for the next step – Making the Mold from the red tortoise model. 
  
 The two part mold compound in this case is Part A white and Part B purple.  When part A and B are mixed I have about 10-15 minutes of working time before the mixture sets. 
A small amount of this mold making compound went with me to Tanzania where I made a mold of a beetle.  It amazed the guide and I gave him some to take home to his kids.  I always wondered what they did with it.


Part A and B were mixed by pressing and folding them into each other. 




Then I wrapped it around the red tortoise pressing so that the designs on the model would show in the mold. 
To give a separation for the top and bottom of the turtle, I took an x-acto knife and cut the mold in half without removing the turtle. 
The mold compound set and I removed the red turtle.  Check out the mold!
The turtle’s head might be a problem when I put the metal clay in the mold so I decided to make another mold that would let the head be in a better place when I removed it.  My next post will show two turtles in metal clay – one from each mold.  
So far so good!  Stay tuned!









Friday, December 2, 2011

Tortoise or the Hare? I’m going for the Tortoise!


After my last post on the Reptile Show, I have decided to make a tortoise out of silver clay.  Thank goodness I have artistic license!  My vision (goal – hope) is to make a small recognizable tortoise that could be duplicated and used as a ring, a pendant, earrings, or beads.  Not having done any of this before, I decided to share the experience with any of you who might be interested! 
First I need to decide on which kind of tortoise….so I Googled ‘tortoise’ and got some amazing pictures.  What a variety!  After looking and thinking, I selected the Star Radiated Tortoise.   It has a very pronounced star pattern and will be a challenge.  
 My plan is to carve a small tortoise out of polymer clay, a medium that is easy to work with and manipulate.  I chose red because I like red! 
I put my new Craftoptic glasses on and start conditioning, moving and carving  referring to the pictures.  As I work with the polymer clay, it gets warm and a little squishy so that my finger prints start to become the pattern.  Start over!  After a few failed attempts, the animal takes shape and is the correct size.  Finally figured out how to put his shell bumps on and texture patterns. 
 Tonight I am baking the red tortoise in my toaster oven. 

 After he is done (hard) I will make a mold and then make several tortoises from silver clay. 



Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Reptile Shows - A New Experience

Have you ever been to a Reptile Show?  If you Google ‘reptile shows’ with your hometown’s name, you might be surprised how many are near you.  I’ve now been to my third one.  And each time I’ve seen and learned so much about both nature and people. 
The first one was in Tucson AZ and I had no idea what to expect...maybe snakes crawling and lizards leaping and weird people.  Once I actually took a deep breath, paid my admission and walked into the large hall, my fears got lost in my amazement of the variety of animals I saw.  
The chameleons were multi-colored and safely caged in habitats of branches and greenery. 
Chameleon
The poisonous Dart Frogs were brightly colored and hopping around the trickling water in their humid terrariums.   (These have toxic skins for their own protection).  Snakes of many patterns and varieties were in containers and carefully monitored. 

Young Green Tree Python


I fell in love with baby bearded dragons as they stacked on top of each other. 
Bearded Dragons
  It was obvious that people were fascinated with these reptiles that originally came from all over the world.  (Now many are captive-bred.)  And now I was one of those ‘weird’ people.
The second show was in Phoenix and there were so many Crested Geckos for sale that I wondered where they all came from.  There are trends in reptile fashions.  Some years there are more boas, some years more corn snakes, some years more skinks.  I had no idea there were so many varieties of lizards, frogs, turtles and snakes.  Nor did I realize that so many people throughout the world are fascinated by them.  Lots to learn!
Crocodile Gecko
This year, Peter and I went to the Phoenix Reptile Expo.  There were more turtles here than I had seen in the past- tiny black polka dotted turtles from Asia, star backed ones called Radiated Tortoises, Pancake Tortoises, and Matamata Turtles.   In general, turtles live in or near the water and have adapted to swim by holding their breath underwater. Tortoises live primarily in arid regions, built for storing their own water supply and walking on sandy ground. 

Pancake Tortoise

There were lots of bearded dragons, crested dragons, geckos, skinks, and chameleons.  Chameleons are fun to look at but not easy to care for. 
Many of the reptiles have been cross-bred to be what are called ‘designer’ reptiles.  The colors and patterns have been altered to be ‘fashionable’. It is often now difficult to find reptiles that have their original coloring and patterns.  But I found an originally colored Leopard Gecko and bought it!  He is very easy to care for and very healthy.   He now has a small aquarium sand and rocks with his hollow log in it. He sleeps during the day and ‘hunts’ at night.  He is a happy lizard! 
There were inanimate replicas of a variety of frogs and lizards for sale and lots of t-shirts and caps.  There were a couple of tables of reptile jewelry and lots of books and accessories. 
It was fascinating watching the people watch the animals, seeing friends meeting friends and vendors exchanging information with each other and customers.  These are animals that get a lot of negative press and are somewhat misunderstood just because they are not warm and fuzzy!  I’m learning so much about them and about how people form attitudes that may or may not be accurate!