Friday, October 28, 2011

Learning As We Go!

Viking knit is the oldest method of chain making and I've become fascinated by it.  Once I conquered the single knit, I decided to add beads.  I could have googled or asked how it was done but it seemed like something I could just figure out.  And I've learned a lot as I proceeded first with tumbled turquoise beads and then with pearls.  I thought I'd share a few of the things I've learned. 

Iif you want a great tutorial on viking knit technique, Trina Ann at http://blog.trinaann.com/ has written a clear concise easy to understand tutorial.  I highly recommend it. 

 
Tumbled tuquoise beads in viking knit

I used tumbled turquoise beads in the first viking knit chain and I did not really know what I was doing.  But I went right ahead and as it turned out, I liked the end result.  Since the beads were irregular in shape there was a random quality to the finished product.

During that process, I began to really understand the technique of viking knit.  Loops need to be in as straight a line as possible and pulling the finished chain through the draw holes evened the chain more. 

Nice rows of knit!
When I started the most recent necklace, I decided to use pearls and was careful to keep the lines of links pretty straight.  I added a pearl inbetween each loop for one round and then I did a round with no beads.  That made a cage around each pearl and was easier to  thread the wire correctly without doing too much damage to the pearls. 

Making room for the wire.


Adding a pearl between the loops.

The viking knit loop after adding th pearl.

Ready to start the row of knit without the pearl.
 I really like the finished look of the pearl tube.  If I will use them again I will wrap or cushion them some way because they are so delicate and it is so easy to damage them.   I pulled the chain through the draw holes until I got it the size I wanted on each side of the pearls leaving the chain the original size in the center with the beads.


One half pulled viking chain and one half ready to be pulled.  Notice the difference in the length.

Copper wire makes a lovely chain that can tarnish and if you are sensitive to copper, it can turn your skin green.  I used Everbrite's ProtectaClear in aerosol form www.EverbriteCoatings.com after antiquing the chain with liver of sulphur and am pleased with the result.  Three coats seems to do a good job and shaking the chain loosens the links enough to be flexible.  I also found that spraying the chain flat and then hanging it on a hook to dry works well.

Finished

Have fun with your viking knit creations and let's continue to share our 'learn as we go' experiences!

Friday, October 28, 2011

Learning As We Go!

Viking knit is the oldest method of chain making and I've become fascinated by it.  Once I conquered the single knit, I decided to add beads.  I could have googled or asked how it was done but it seemed like something I could just figure out.  And I've learned a lot as I proceeded first with tumbled turquoise beads and then with pearls.  I thought I'd share a few of the things I've learned. 

Iif you want a great tutorial on viking knit technique, Trina Ann at http://blog.trinaann.com/ has written a clear concise easy to understand tutorial.  I highly recommend it. 

 
Tumbled tuquoise beads in viking knit

I used tumbled turquoise beads in the first viking knit chain and I did not really know what I was doing.  But I went right ahead and as it turned out, I liked the end result.  Since the beads were irregular in shape there was a random quality to the finished product.

During that process, I began to really understand the technique of viking knit.  Loops need to be in as straight a line as possible and pulling the finished chain through the draw holes evened the chain more. 

Nice rows of knit!
When I started the most recent necklace, I decided to use pearls and was careful to keep the lines of links pretty straight.  I added a pearl inbetween each loop for one round and then I did a round with no beads.  That made a cage around each pearl and was easier to  thread the wire correctly without doing too much damage to the pearls. 

Making room for the wire.


Adding a pearl between the loops.

The viking knit loop after adding th pearl.

Ready to start the row of knit without the pearl.
 I really like the finished look of the pearl tube.  If I will use them again I will wrap or cushion them some way because they are so delicate and it is so easy to damage them.   I pulled the chain through the draw holes until I got it the size I wanted on each side of the pearls leaving the chain the original size in the center with the beads.


One half pulled viking chain and one half ready to be pulled.  Notice the difference in the length.

Copper wire makes a lovely chain that can tarnish and if you are sensitive to copper, it can turn your skin green.  I used Everbrite's ProtectaClear in aerosol form www.EverbriteCoatings.com after antiquing the chain with liver of sulphur and am pleased with the result.  Three coats seems to do a good job and shaking the chain loosens the links enough to be flexible.  I also found that spraying the chain flat and then hanging it on a hook to dry works well.

Finished

Have fun with your viking knit creations and let's continue to share our 'learn as we go' experiences!