Friday, December 14, 2012

A Polymer Clay Framed Mirror

Several years ago I took my first polymer clay class from Lisa Pavelka.  I was so excited about the things I learned that I looked for ways to use polymer in my professional work as an interior designer. 
A client needed a large mirror for a niche area over her fireplace and there was my opportunity!  I explained my idea and she was almost as excited as I was.  She would have a unique mirror and I would be able to make it.  I’ve always liked large but repetition is not a strong point of mine.  My small toaster oven would get a work out with this large mirror.  Better get started. 
The back was a composite board cut to her dimensions – approximately 30” x 40”.  The Mirror was attached and the entire piece was on my work table.  I ordered a box of Kato copper clay and started making 10” strips that would ruffle to 6” and fit into the oven – one at a time.  At the time, I had three employees and they all started to help.  It became apparent that we each had a different style and that a composite group was not going to work.  Phyllis, the best ruffle maker, and I finished all the pieces and I glued them to the board as a frame for the mirror. 
The wholesale floral shop in Tucson, Askren’s and Sons, sold me copper rope the perfect thickness and that went on the outside and inside of the ruffles.  The finishing touches were a few beads skillfully tucked in the rope.   
The mirror turned out great and the client still has it after two moves.  I’ve never made another!  I still have some of the clay and yes, it is still good!

Friday, December 14, 2012

A Polymer Clay Framed Mirror

Several years ago I took my first polymer clay class from Lisa Pavelka.  I was so excited about the things I learned that I looked for ways to use polymer in my professional work as an interior designer. 
A client needed a large mirror for a niche area over her fireplace and there was my opportunity!  I explained my idea and she was almost as excited as I was.  She would have a unique mirror and I would be able to make it.  I’ve always liked large but repetition is not a strong point of mine.  My small toaster oven would get a work out with this large mirror.  Better get started. 
The back was a composite board cut to her dimensions – approximately 30” x 40”.  The Mirror was attached and the entire piece was on my work table.  I ordered a box of Kato copper clay and started making 10” strips that would ruffle to 6” and fit into the oven – one at a time.  At the time, I had three employees and they all started to help.  It became apparent that we each had a different style and that a composite group was not going to work.  Phyllis, the best ruffle maker, and I finished all the pieces and I glued them to the board as a frame for the mirror. 
The wholesale floral shop in Tucson, Askren’s and Sons, sold me copper rope the perfect thickness and that went on the outside and inside of the ruffles.  The finishing touches were a few beads skillfully tucked in the rope.   
The mirror turned out great and the client still has it after two moves.  I’ve never made another!  I still have some of the clay and yes, it is still good!