Friday, May 22, 2015

Birds of a Feather or Backing the Birds!

Guinea Hen
The feathers on the backs of birds form patterns when birds fold their wings and sit, perch or walk.
  
Slate-coloured Boubou
The male and females of the same species are different because the male birds are usually so much more colorful. (I've often thought that was unfair!) 

Male Woodduck
Female Woodduck

I started paying attention to the bird’s back patterns in Australia when I took a picture of a bird on a tall stick and tried to identify it. (Of course, I can't find that picture for this blog post!) The bird’s back was toward me and the back is not a typical field mark.  Sometimes I’m so involved in looking at the feathers and patterns that I forget to look at the field marks for identification! 


Great Argus

 And color certainly helps form the pattern.


Different sizes and locations of feathers on the bodies and the wings, the way the wings fold together, different colors and the different requirements for flight and camouflage combine to give each bird its interesting pattern.

Australian King Parrot

Western Bluebird


Cedar Wax-wing


Female Cardinal 



House Finch

Common Grackle











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Friday, May 22, 2015

Birds of a Feather or Backing the Birds!

Guinea Hen
The feathers on the backs of birds form patterns when birds fold their wings and sit, perch or walk.
  
Slate-coloured Boubou
The male and females of the same species are different because the male birds are usually so much more colorful. (I've often thought that was unfair!) 

Male Woodduck
Female Woodduck

I started paying attention to the bird’s back patterns in Australia when I took a picture of a bird on a tall stick and tried to identify it. (Of course, I can't find that picture for this blog post!) The bird’s back was toward me and the back is not a typical field mark.  Sometimes I’m so involved in looking at the feathers and patterns that I forget to look at the field marks for identification! 


Great Argus

 And color certainly helps form the pattern.


Different sizes and locations of feathers on the bodies and the wings, the way the wings fold together, different colors and the different requirements for flight and camouflage combine to give each bird its interesting pattern.

Australian King Parrot

Western Bluebird


Cedar Wax-wing


Female Cardinal 



House Finch

Common Grackle











No comments:

Post a Comment