Friday, September 23, 2016

Trying Something New - Silk Screening on Polymer Clay

Looks like leather!  I used chalk, guilder's paste and Golden's paint

Silk screening on polymer clay seems to be a big topic of interest lately with lots of Facebook posts and tutorials.  Guess it's time for me to try something new!  Helen Breil has a great tutorial (free) to get us started.  http://www.helenbreil.com/silk-screen-demo.html 
After watching Helen's tutorial as well as others, I decided that a rainy day would be perfect to start experimenting.   I used to do silk screening on fabric in college and this is the same idea.

I took my Kato white polymer scrap clay, conditioned it and put it through the widest setting on my pasta machine.  I put it on a piece of paper to leach (that makes the clay stiffer and not so soft and squishy). 

My stencils are made of paper that I verathaned to keep them waterproof so they would last longer and one small metal stencil.  I've ordered a couple of Helen Breil's stencils but I'm using mine until they come.  I have chalk pastels which I scrape into powder and Guilder's Paste as well as acrylic paint.  It would be easier (and more expensive) to buy pan pastels with the nifty application that is on the demo but scraping works well and I found that Q-tips make good applicators.  

The acrylic paint needs to be thick.  I used a medium thick paint and it seeped under the stencil -  not a nice design!  Under  each photo I've listed the materials used.  I understand not all acrylics work well with polymer but I've not had a problem.  I used what I had on hand.  I even tried a fabric paint.

Here are the results!
My first attempts  I added a stencil on top of shaded chalk.  Chalk makes it easy to blend colors.  Testing paint on top of chalk - The one on the left shows what happens when the paint is not thick enough.  It seeps under the stencil!  The blue bird on the right is 'Tulip Pearl' fabric paint.  It's puffy and could be fun and it works.  The center pieces show thick paint over chalk.

In the upper right hand corner is an old credit card with 2 colors of paint alternating (gold and brown).  The stencil is on top of clay with chalk.  

I swiped the paint on the card over the stencil.  The brayer is used to make the stencil really stick to the clay.

Stencil has been carefully lifted off the clay.




Golden acrylic paint over clay.  I used scrap clay that had chalk mixed in it for the background.

Charcoal colored clay with gold and copper Guilder's Past.  The Golden's Quinacridone Crimson acrylic paint  was swiped over the stencil.  When cured this looks like leather!  The red is shiny.

The stencil lays over the charcoal colored clay.  I scraped the chalk colors and used a Q-tip to apply the chalk and blend the colors.

Stencil removed!  Reminds me of stained glass.

 This has been fun experience and I'll try more of it.  Now to see if I want to use parts of these creations in jewelry!

Friday, September 2, 2016



It's September and I'm really not ready for the fall season!  I'm still wanting those warm days with the  hot sun, a good book on my ipad and the quiet afternoons on my deck with the birds and lizards.  I've started looking in my closet for summer things that I haven't worn! And I'm thinking of things that I want to do before the first snow in late October.  In the meantime there are beautiful places to visit and help ease the transition into fall.

Visiting the lakes and taking a walk are things we love to do on a glorious day here in Prescott AZ. Wednesday's are 'free park' days and Peter and I will start making our weekly trips to all the lakes checking on the birds in the area.  We went to Watson Lake and found some Cormorants, Canadian Geese, and local Mallards.  It was too early for the ducks to return andI got excited about the lines of plants with a Cormorant tucked in the center.


The sky was blue with lovely billowy white clouds and many plants were blooming yellow.  


The  Datura were really showing off with massive amounts of white blooms.



Next stop - Willow Lake where the water was like glass.  At the edge of the lake I found lots of Mayflies and tiny insects among the  green water plants and rocks.



 Grasshoppers were seen occasionally clinging to grass.



 And then I saw the rock reflections in the water and was mesmerized.  I could hardly tell where the rocks stopped and the water began.  The designs made me think of American Indian designs and I just could not take enough pictures as I sat there enjoying nature at its finest.


Friday, August 26, 2016


Recently I purchased Jeanette Kandray’s tutorial ‘Magnificent Mokume Gane’.  The pictures were so enticing that I just had to see and try her technique. 

Mokume Gane is a metal working technique (Japanese) that fuses several layers of different colored precious metals together to form a sandwich of alloys.  The term is now used in many other mediums where different colors of materials such as polymer clay or metal clays are sandwiched.  In the case of polymer clay, we stack sheets of colored clay, make a design in them with tools or texture sheets, and carefully slice some of the top color away exposing the stacked colors beneath.

Jeanette Kandray tutorial shares a technique that shortens the process considerably and produces varied effects depending on the choice of colors and texture sheets used.  The tutorial is well written and clearly illustrated.  In my opinion well worth the price of $12.00.    https://www.etsy.com/listing/457367494/magnificent-mokume-gane?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=magnificant&ref=sr_gallery_4


After experimenting on several sheets of clay and enjoying the process and the end products I decided to share my fun!  By changing the texture sheets and colors, you can produce such interesting patterns!

This is my first sheet of polymer clay following  the tutorial.  I used gold, purple, green , pearl and cobalt blue.

A finished pair of earrings I call 'Autumn Nights'

One of the things I like about using a tutorial is traveling to the creative places the technique takes me. I get to add things and change things once I understand the original idea.  I'm sharing one of those places here!


The following 5 sheets of polymer have the same colors as their base- gold, pearl, copper, ecru and antique gold.  I placed a copper thin sheet on top before I textured .   On the 3 lower sheets, I placed a thin sheet of black and then textured.  You can see how different each one looks depending of the top color and the texture.  In each case I carefully removed the raised parts of the design that were made by the pressing the texture into the clay.  The underlying colors peek through.  Remember that the colors below the top sheet are the same in each piece. 

Adding a different color as the top layer
finished pieces


Friday, September 23, 2016

Trying Something New - Silk Screening on Polymer Clay

Looks like leather!  I used chalk, guilder's paste and Golden's paint

Silk screening on polymer clay seems to be a big topic of interest lately with lots of Facebook posts and tutorials.  Guess it's time for me to try something new!  Helen Breil has a great tutorial (free) to get us started.  http://www.helenbreil.com/silk-screen-demo.html 
After watching Helen's tutorial as well as others, I decided that a rainy day would be perfect to start experimenting.   I used to do silk screening on fabric in college and this is the same idea.

I took my Kato white polymer scrap clay, conditioned it and put it through the widest setting on my pasta machine.  I put it on a piece of paper to leach (that makes the clay stiffer and not so soft and squishy). 

My stencils are made of paper that I verathaned to keep them waterproof so they would last longer and one small metal stencil.  I've ordered a couple of Helen Breil's stencils but I'm using mine until they come.  I have chalk pastels which I scrape into powder and Guilder's Paste as well as acrylic paint.  It would be easier (and more expensive) to buy pan pastels with the nifty application that is on the demo but scraping works well and I found that Q-tips make good applicators.  

The acrylic paint needs to be thick.  I used a medium thick paint and it seeped under the stencil -  not a nice design!  Under  each photo I've listed the materials used.  I understand not all acrylics work well with polymer but I've not had a problem.  I used what I had on hand.  I even tried a fabric paint.

Here are the results!
My first attempts  I added a stencil on top of shaded chalk.  Chalk makes it easy to blend colors.  Testing paint on top of chalk - The one on the left shows what happens when the paint is not thick enough.  It seeps under the stencil!  The blue bird on the right is 'Tulip Pearl' fabric paint.  It's puffy and could be fun and it works.  The center pieces show thick paint over chalk.

In the upper right hand corner is an old credit card with 2 colors of paint alternating (gold and brown).  The stencil is on top of clay with chalk.  

I swiped the paint on the card over the stencil.  The brayer is used to make the stencil really stick to the clay.

Stencil has been carefully lifted off the clay.




Golden acrylic paint over clay.  I used scrap clay that had chalk mixed in it for the background.

Charcoal colored clay with gold and copper Guilder's Past.  The Golden's Quinacridone Crimson acrylic paint  was swiped over the stencil.  When cured this looks like leather!  The red is shiny.

The stencil lays over the charcoal colored clay.  I scraped the chalk colors and used a Q-tip to apply the chalk and blend the colors.

Stencil removed!  Reminds me of stained glass.

 This has been fun experience and I'll try more of it.  Now to see if I want to use parts of these creations in jewelry!

Friday, September 2, 2016



It's September and I'm really not ready for the fall season!  I'm still wanting those warm days with the  hot sun, a good book on my ipad and the quiet afternoons on my deck with the birds and lizards.  I've started looking in my closet for summer things that I haven't worn! And I'm thinking of things that I want to do before the first snow in late October.  In the meantime there are beautiful places to visit and help ease the transition into fall.

Visiting the lakes and taking a walk are things we love to do on a glorious day here in Prescott AZ. Wednesday's are 'free park' days and Peter and I will start making our weekly trips to all the lakes checking on the birds in the area.  We went to Watson Lake and found some Cormorants, Canadian Geese, and local Mallards.  It was too early for the ducks to return andI got excited about the lines of plants with a Cormorant tucked in the center.


The sky was blue with lovely billowy white clouds and many plants were blooming yellow.  


The  Datura were really showing off with massive amounts of white blooms.



Next stop - Willow Lake where the water was like glass.  At the edge of the lake I found lots of Mayflies and tiny insects among the  green water plants and rocks.



 Grasshoppers were seen occasionally clinging to grass.



 And then I saw the rock reflections in the water and was mesmerized.  I could hardly tell where the rocks stopped and the water began.  The designs made me think of American Indian designs and I just could not take enough pictures as I sat there enjoying nature at its finest.


Friday, August 26, 2016


Recently I purchased Jeanette Kandray’s tutorial ‘Magnificent Mokume Gane’.  The pictures were so enticing that I just had to see and try her technique. 

Mokume Gane is a metal working technique (Japanese) that fuses several layers of different colored precious metals together to form a sandwich of alloys.  The term is now used in many other mediums where different colors of materials such as polymer clay or metal clays are sandwiched.  In the case of polymer clay, we stack sheets of colored clay, make a design in them with tools or texture sheets, and carefully slice some of the top color away exposing the stacked colors beneath.

Jeanette Kandray tutorial shares a technique that shortens the process considerably and produces varied effects depending on the choice of colors and texture sheets used.  The tutorial is well written and clearly illustrated.  In my opinion well worth the price of $12.00.    https://www.etsy.com/listing/457367494/magnificent-mokume-gane?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=magnificant&ref=sr_gallery_4


After experimenting on several sheets of clay and enjoying the process and the end products I decided to share my fun!  By changing the texture sheets and colors, you can produce such interesting patterns!

This is my first sheet of polymer clay following  the tutorial.  I used gold, purple, green , pearl and cobalt blue.

A finished pair of earrings I call 'Autumn Nights'

One of the things I like about using a tutorial is traveling to the creative places the technique takes me. I get to add things and change things once I understand the original idea.  I'm sharing one of those places here!


The following 5 sheets of polymer have the same colors as their base- gold, pearl, copper, ecru and antique gold.  I placed a copper thin sheet on top before I textured .   On the 3 lower sheets, I placed a thin sheet of black and then textured.  You can see how different each one looks depending of the top color and the texture.  In each case I carefully removed the raised parts of the design that were made by the pressing the texture into the clay.  The underlying colors peek through.  Remember that the colors below the top sheet are the same in each piece. 

Adding a different color as the top layer
finished pieces