Friday, December 5, 2014

Organic Forms




Organic seems to be the rage right now. I've always loved the forms of nature and  when I saw the pictures of  Eugena Topinas openwork forms, I knew I had to have her tutorial. https://www.etsy.com/listing/199228011/polymer-clay-tutorial-openwork-pendants?ref=sr_gallery_1&ga_search_query=openwork+polymer+clay+tutorial&ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery   

I was not disappointed as I read “Polymer Clay Tutorial Openwork Pendants: Under a Microscope”.   The tutorial is detailed. clearly written with good illustrations but as with many things, one has to try it to really understand or believe it.  Using polymer clay and the supplies listed in the tutorial, I went to work following the directions. 

openwork before dissolution
Everything went well until the part where you have to put the form into water to dissolve the part that creates the open work.  I had pans of water all over the kitchen for days before I had dissolution! At one point Eugena warns about being impatient because the polymer walls are fragile and easily destroyed.  That is absolutely true.  I’m sure you realize that I am trying not to give any of the secrets of the tutorial away.   If you like the look and want to test your patience, I recommend buying the tutorial! 


When I learn a new technique somewhere along the way I make it mine by deviating from the instructions or seeing if I can do something else with it.  That was true with this tutorial and I want to share my experience with you. 

Some have backs and some do not

After I conquered the concept of openwork, I decided I wanted to make a medallion that was bigger and thicker than the ones in the tutorial-something that would look old and bone-like. I made my large cane (groups of polymer tubes) and cut it about ¾” thick.  I put it on a plastic dome, turned it upside down in a bowl of water and waited for the inside of the tubes to dissolve.  I waited 4 weeks!  (Impatience?)

Larger and thicker than the tutorial recommends


Finally I decided it was time to take it off the tube. Impatience at work! The clay medallion was fiercely stuck to the plastic dome and I had to carefully cut and lift the clay.  The plastic dome went in the trash as I took the fragile medallion to the oven to cure.  It turned out a lot better than I expected and it does look old and rustic.  This is the medallion and chain that I asked everyone to vote on last week.  (Pearls won over coral!)


I decided to use one of other medallions with the coral beads.  A more casual summer organic look!


I tried all of the variations in the tutorial and have lots of openwork circles.  I made earrings, pendants, and beads.

pendant and post earrings

Beads - I love these!
I still had circles!  That is when I saw the video tutorial of Sona Grigoryan on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGMjRdStUiI&list=PL_fsqalybeEIhTwWe-MdVBLtr3DLJh0Z0  and decided to put the circles into cuffs.  This is the final result.  


This really turned into quite the organic project!





2 comments:

  1. Your works are lovely! I love what you are doing with technique. Cannot wait to see more!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Linda, I just wanted to add that thanks to your comments and our Facebook discussion, I edited the tutorial. It now includes explanations as to why certain steps had to be done the way they are described in the tutorial. I hope this will be helpful.

    ReplyDelete

Friday, December 5, 2014

Organic Forms




Organic seems to be the rage right now. I've always loved the forms of nature and  when I saw the pictures of  Eugena Topinas openwork forms, I knew I had to have her tutorial. https://www.etsy.com/listing/199228011/polymer-clay-tutorial-openwork-pendants?ref=sr_gallery_1&ga_search_query=openwork+polymer+clay+tutorial&ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery   

I was not disappointed as I read “Polymer Clay Tutorial Openwork Pendants: Under a Microscope”.   The tutorial is detailed. clearly written with good illustrations but as with many things, one has to try it to really understand or believe it.  Using polymer clay and the supplies listed in the tutorial, I went to work following the directions. 

openwork before dissolution
Everything went well until the part where you have to put the form into water to dissolve the part that creates the open work.  I had pans of water all over the kitchen for days before I had dissolution! At one point Eugena warns about being impatient because the polymer walls are fragile and easily destroyed.  That is absolutely true.  I’m sure you realize that I am trying not to give any of the secrets of the tutorial away.   If you like the look and want to test your patience, I recommend buying the tutorial! 


When I learn a new technique somewhere along the way I make it mine by deviating from the instructions or seeing if I can do something else with it.  That was true with this tutorial and I want to share my experience with you. 

Some have backs and some do not

After I conquered the concept of openwork, I decided I wanted to make a medallion that was bigger and thicker than the ones in the tutorial-something that would look old and bone-like. I made my large cane (groups of polymer tubes) and cut it about ¾” thick.  I put it on a plastic dome, turned it upside down in a bowl of water and waited for the inside of the tubes to dissolve.  I waited 4 weeks!  (Impatience?)

Larger and thicker than the tutorial recommends


Finally I decided it was time to take it off the tube. Impatience at work! The clay medallion was fiercely stuck to the plastic dome and I had to carefully cut and lift the clay.  The plastic dome went in the trash as I took the fragile medallion to the oven to cure.  It turned out a lot better than I expected and it does look old and rustic.  This is the medallion and chain that I asked everyone to vote on last week.  (Pearls won over coral!)


I decided to use one of other medallions with the coral beads.  A more casual summer organic look!


I tried all of the variations in the tutorial and have lots of openwork circles.  I made earrings, pendants, and beads.

pendant and post earrings

Beads - I love these!
I still had circles!  That is when I saw the video tutorial of Sona Grigoryan on youtube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGMjRdStUiI&list=PL_fsqalybeEIhTwWe-MdVBLtr3DLJh0Z0  and decided to put the circles into cuffs.  This is the final result.  


This really turned into quite the organic project!





2 comments:

  1. Your works are lovely! I love what you are doing with technique. Cannot wait to see more!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Linda, I just wanted to add that thanks to your comments and our Facebook discussion, I edited the tutorial. It now includes explanations as to why certain steps had to be done the way they are described in the tutorial. I hope this will be helpful.

    ReplyDelete