Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Nature Through My Eyes - Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are the tiniest of birds and one of the most fascinating species.  Everywhere I’ve lived, I’ve been able to watch these birds at feeders, hover in the air, get the nectar from bell shaped flowers and flash their colors in the sun.  I love to capture their image in my jewelry and I just found out that they sing with their tail feathers! http://newyork.ibtimes.com/articles/211694/20110910/hummingbird-sing-feather-flutter-sound-male.htm 
We have seen several Rufous hummingbirds on their migration flight this summer.  Currently an Anna’s hummingbird has staked out his territory at our feeder.  He buzzes any other hummer who even thinks about getting a drink!
Peter and I went to Ecuador a couple of years ago and being avid birders we looked for hummingbirds.  I had no idea how many different ones exist.  There are over 300 different species and Ecuador has the most!   The variety of details in their feathers, shapes and colors can be overwhelming.  
We were standing on the very large deck of our accommodations in Tandayapa. There were at least two dozen hummingbird feeders tucked in trees and on posts.  The singing was deafening. 

All at once, one of these lovely creatures flew into the glass patio door and knocked itself out.  Our guide carefully picked it up and held it in his hand as the host went to get sugar water.  Gently the guide dripped the sugar water into the bird’s mouth and about 15 minutes later the bird ‘came to’ and flew away.  That was one of the most amazing experiences of the trip. 

 While that was going on, the ‘booted Racket-tailed’ hummingbird landed on a feeder and his white ‘boots’ fluffed out around his feet. 





And I’m surprised that the long tailed hummingbird has any tail feathers.  They are very long and beautiful and seem like they would get caught often.  Apparently not!   



Hummingbirds encourage me to pay attention to the details, the colors, the intent, and the need to relax.  They spend most of their lives perching!


If you are interested in lots of facts and information about hummingbirds, this is a great site!  http://www.worldofhummingbirds.com/facts.php






Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Nature Through My Eyes - Hummingbirds

Hummingbirds are the tiniest of birds and one of the most fascinating species.  Everywhere I’ve lived, I’ve been able to watch these birds at feeders, hover in the air, get the nectar from bell shaped flowers and flash their colors in the sun.  I love to capture their image in my jewelry and I just found out that they sing with their tail feathers! http://newyork.ibtimes.com/articles/211694/20110910/hummingbird-sing-feather-flutter-sound-male.htm 
We have seen several Rufous hummingbirds on their migration flight this summer.  Currently an Anna’s hummingbird has staked out his territory at our feeder.  He buzzes any other hummer who even thinks about getting a drink!
Peter and I went to Ecuador a couple of years ago and being avid birders we looked for hummingbirds.  I had no idea how many different ones exist.  There are over 300 different species and Ecuador has the most!   The variety of details in their feathers, shapes and colors can be overwhelming.  
We were standing on the very large deck of our accommodations in Tandayapa. There were at least two dozen hummingbird feeders tucked in trees and on posts.  The singing was deafening. 

All at once, one of these lovely creatures flew into the glass patio door and knocked itself out.  Our guide carefully picked it up and held it in his hand as the host went to get sugar water.  Gently the guide dripped the sugar water into the bird’s mouth and about 15 minutes later the bird ‘came to’ and flew away.  That was one of the most amazing experiences of the trip. 

 While that was going on, the ‘booted Racket-tailed’ hummingbird landed on a feeder and his white ‘boots’ fluffed out around his feet. 





And I’m surprised that the long tailed hummingbird has any tail feathers.  They are very long and beautiful and seem like they would get caught often.  Apparently not!   



Hummingbirds encourage me to pay attention to the details, the colors, the intent, and the need to relax.  They spend most of their lives perching!


If you are interested in lots of facts and information about hummingbirds, this is a great site!  http://www.worldofhummingbirds.com/facts.php