Friday, February 10, 2012

The Adventure of Making Chain


Bead-It (Prescott AZ) and I are offering a class to make a viking knit bracelet in March.  I took the class example in to the bead store and in the process came home with two new (to me) tools to experiment with - a Knitting Spool and a Wyr Knittr. I wanted to know how the chain looked using these techniques compared to the Viking knit and how the processes differed.
Viking Knit Example









Check my post on viking knit to see that technique. http://lindabrittdesign.blogspot.com/2011/10/learning-as-we-go.html

 I started with the Knitting Spool – a wooden spool about 3” tall and 1 ½” wide with a hole through the middle.  There are 5 cotter pins on the top and the wire is wound around the pins in one of 2 patterns.  A pick helps put the lower wire over the upper wire at each cotter pin for each row.  The knitted tube is funneled through the center hole and comes out the bottom.   

Knitter Spool Example

I think it took me a couple of tries to conquer the technique and I found it fun to see the tube grow.  I made enough for a bracelet and when I took it off the spool, it definitely looks knitted. Completely different look than the viking knit.   I used 26 gauge wire and could certainly use 28 or 30. 
    Wyr Knitter came in a package with 3 heavy clips, the knitter, and 30 gauge wire.  I read the instructions…several times.  And then I started with step 1, step 2, step 3…….  I figured out the technique on the 4th try.  I sometimes wonder if I am just slow and if one of those times was now. 
Wyr Knitter

By the time I learned to hold the knitter correctly applying the correct tension to the wire, attached the clip on the bottom as I continued reading the directions turning the handle slowly, I knew this was going to take some time.  It is vital that the wire and the hooks work in tandem and if you don’t watch carefully the clip on the hook will be in the wrong position or not allow the wire to come up and over.   

I was expecting the knittr to facilitate the process but I found I had to pay very close attention.  The wire also kept breaking increasing my frustration level.  So after 12 attempts to knit with this contraption, I decided to write this post.  As you can see in the photos, I eventually got 1” done and it looks good.  And yes, the wire broke and I quit. 
Two bad examples of Wyr Knittr - wire brok often
This is just NOT a tool that I will have at my disposal.  I’m sure many people use it effectively.  I’ve seen the pictures.   In fact, I went on line looking for information that might make it easier and give me a reason to try again.  The link www.wyrknittr.com that came with the tool has no information on this.  I googled wyr knittr and found several places that sell and have the same pictures as the instructions.  My advice on this tool would be …..find someplace to try it before investing.  I’m taking mine back to the store! 
  


Friday, February 10, 2012

The Adventure of Making Chain


Bead-It (Prescott AZ) and I are offering a class to make a viking knit bracelet in March.  I took the class example in to the bead store and in the process came home with two new (to me) tools to experiment with - a Knitting Spool and a Wyr Knittr. I wanted to know how the chain looked using these techniques compared to the Viking knit and how the processes differed.
Viking Knit Example









Check my post on viking knit to see that technique. http://lindabrittdesign.blogspot.com/2011/10/learning-as-we-go.html

 I started with the Knitting Spool – a wooden spool about 3” tall and 1 ½” wide with a hole through the middle.  There are 5 cotter pins on the top and the wire is wound around the pins in one of 2 patterns.  A pick helps put the lower wire over the upper wire at each cotter pin for each row.  The knitted tube is funneled through the center hole and comes out the bottom.   

Knitter Spool Example

I think it took me a couple of tries to conquer the technique and I found it fun to see the tube grow.  I made enough for a bracelet and when I took it off the spool, it definitely looks knitted. Completely different look than the viking knit.   I used 26 gauge wire and could certainly use 28 or 30. 
    Wyr Knitter came in a package with 3 heavy clips, the knitter, and 30 gauge wire.  I read the instructions…several times.  And then I started with step 1, step 2, step 3…….  I figured out the technique on the 4th try.  I sometimes wonder if I am just slow and if one of those times was now. 
Wyr Knitter

By the time I learned to hold the knitter correctly applying the correct tension to the wire, attached the clip on the bottom as I continued reading the directions turning the handle slowly, I knew this was going to take some time.  It is vital that the wire and the hooks work in tandem and if you don’t watch carefully the clip on the hook will be in the wrong position or not allow the wire to come up and over.   

I was expecting the knittr to facilitate the process but I found I had to pay very close attention.  The wire also kept breaking increasing my frustration level.  So after 12 attempts to knit with this contraption, I decided to write this post.  As you can see in the photos, I eventually got 1” done and it looks good.  And yes, the wire broke and I quit. 
Two bad examples of Wyr Knittr - wire brok often
This is just NOT a tool that I will have at my disposal.  I’m sure many people use it effectively.  I’ve seen the pictures.   In fact, I went on line looking for information that might make it easier and give me a reason to try again.  The link www.wyrknittr.com that came with the tool has no information on this.  I googled wyr knittr and found several places that sell and have the same pictures as the instructions.  My advice on this tool would be …..find someplace to try it before investing.  I’m taking mine back to the store!